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Zombies of Mora Tau (Arrow Video) Blu-ray Review


The 50's were a special time for science fiction films and Zombies of Mora Tau is definitely one of them. We take a look at the brand new blu-ray from Arrow Video.

Studio: Arrow Video
Release Date: March 1957 (theatrical)
                           September 14th, 2021 (blu-ray)
Run Time: 1 hour 9 minutes 4 seconds
Region Code: FREE
Picture: 1080p (1.78:1 aspect ratio)
Sound: English DTS-HD Mono
Subtitles: English SDH
Slipcover: No, but does come in a hard box with three other films
Digital Copy: No
Starring: Gregg Palmer, Allison Hayes, Autumn Russell, Joel Ashley, Morris Ankrum, Marjorie Eaton, and Gene Roth
Written by Bernard Gordon
Directed by Edward L. Cahn
Rating: Not Rated (violence)


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Poster

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What's It About?

American tycoon George Harrison, his beautiful wife, Mona, and deep-sea diver Jeff Clark are off the coast of Africa hoping to salvage a fortune in diamonds at the bottom of the sea near the voodoo-haunted island of Mora Tau, and are joined by an English girl named Jan. The treasure is reported to be guarded by Zombies, walking dead-men doomed to roam the earth until men stop trying to find the sacred treasure. Here, they are walking the sea-bottom, and there is a large conflict of interest between them and the treasure-seekers...
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Film Review

ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU is pretty standard fare. It has everything that we have come to expect from a film like this. The acting is fine, the direction is of the "set the camera here and shoot wide" variety, and the action is shot in a very boring way. This is not to say that the film is boring. There are spots where it is, but the film is actually kind of good. I wasn't completely won over by it, but it never grew too stale. I have always liked films like this, so it wasn't a slog to get through. There is a charm to the film that many 50's films had. There really isn't much more to say about the film, so I will end the review here.
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Video/Audio

Presented in an aspect ratio of 1.78:1, ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU looks really good. This doesn't feel like an Arrow Video transfer as there is very little grain to be found, and the picture has a digital feel to it every now and then. However, there is some very nice detail to be found here and the print is clean.

The mono DTS-HD Master Audio track gets the job done. Dialogue is crisp and clean.
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Extras/Packaging


Introduction by Kim Newman (7m 35s, HD, 1.78:1)
Commentary by Kat Ellinger
Atomic Terror: Genre in Transformation 
Theatrical Trailer
Image Gallery

ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU is part of the COLD WAR CREATURES: FOUR FILMS FROM SAM KATZMAN boxset from Arrow Video. The set also includes CREATURE WITH THE ATOM BRAIN, THE WEREWOLF, and THE GIANT CLAW. Each film is presented on it's own blu-ray and comes with bevy of special features. Each blu-ray also comes in it's own case with reversible artwork. Also included in the box are some postcards, a 60-page booklet with writings on the films, an 80-page art book, and 2 double-sided posters with each of the four films' original theatrical posters (2 per poster)
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Overall

ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU was released many years before George A. Romero would redefine what a zombie is, so these zombies are not the ones that we have become to used to. While they are lumbering like the Romero zombies, they are also focused on protecting a ship and nothing else. The film is pretty decent, but it isn't very memorable. It'll get you through a slow Sunday afternoon and that is really all well need sometimes. The blu-ray is pretty nice with good picture and sound, and some pretty good special features. 
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Extras/Menus

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Film

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